Linux

Overlay with Qt 4.5 snapshot ebuilds

Recently stumbled over this blog post: http://labs.trolltech.com/blogs/2008/12/04/how-kde-4-is-blocking-qt-45/

Looks like it's usable for KDE 4 trunk already, and the improvements to the WebKit engine got me interested in trying it. So I spend 2 hours in creating ebuilds for the Qt 4.5 snapshots - based on the split Qt 4.4.2 ebuilds in portage.

Howto: Log firewall from OpenWrt to a remote rsyslog

This is how I got remote logging from my OpenWrt router to the syslog daemon on the server box.

On the server side, I enabled remote logging over UDP (refer to the rsyslog or syslog-ng documentation).

On the OpenWRT box following steps are needed

Enable remote syslog logging

Edit /etc/config/system and enable remote logging by adding:

option 'log_ip' '192.168.1.2'

Now reboot the router and see if it logs correctly.

Search for a good audio player

For a long time i've been a fan of simple WinAMP-style music players, and went the XMMS -> BMP -> Audacious way. Then, with my collection growing over the years, I got to like library driven players, with Amarok 1.4* being the best regarding music management capabilities.

Running KDE4 I decided to get rid of kdelibs-3 and everything depending on it, inkluding Amarok 1. So I need a new music manager/player.

This is what I tried out so far:

Gentoo portage overlay

Here is some info on my personal Gentoo portage overlay.

 

You can browse it online via the VCS module.

To check out the whole overlay either use layman:

layman -f -o http://gimpel.ath.cx/~tom/layman-gimpel.list -a gimpel

or use SVN directly:

svn co http://gimpel.ath.cx/svn/gimpel/

 

Overlay summary

Most of the ebuilds here provide bleeding edge stuff, including very latest versions and live SVN/CVS ebuilds, mainly multimedia related.

Howto: Convert avi/mov/any video to Flash/flv on Linux

Recently I wanted to convert a Quicktime .mov video to Flash .flv in order to post it on this page, for the fun of it.
First thought: uuuh how do I do this on Linux? But it's pretty simple, thanks to ffmpeg. Works fine with anything that ffmpeg can play, so avi, mpeg, wmv or whatever.

It's as simple as:

ffmpeg -i input.avi -s 320x240 -ar 44100 -o movie.flv

There is also a nice tool to add metadata info like duration etc to flv files, called flvtool2.